Bridges

On a ride down the Namdae River bicycle path, I made several photos of the undersides of bridges.

One of my favourite photographers, Sam Abell, learned the technique of ‘compose and wait’ from his father. I’m learning it from reading Mr. Abell’s books and listening to his lectures online. I spent a few minutes looking at the underside of this bridge and framing the supports and the concrete bicycle path. Then I waited. Several people walked by but their clothes were dark and blended in with the water in the background. A cyclist whizzed by but was moving too quickly for me to catch. Then this gentleman came by wearing light clothes, a light hat, and riding a light-coloured bicycle. Also, he wasn’t moving very quickly so I was able to press the shutter button before he exited the frame.

I didn’t have to wait in this case because the apartments weren’t going anywhere. I made one version of this photo without the ladder and catwalk on the left. It looked nice, but the underside of the bridge is so dark that it’s not obvious what is framing the apartments. And it’s slightly bland. So stepped to the left and included the metalwork. Now, I hope, the viewer can see that this must have been a bridge I was standing under. I like this photo, but I worry that there is too much visual weight on the left. It might be worth going back to this spot when the light is less harsh so I can leave out the catwalk and allow some details of the bridge to show. Stay tuned . . . .

As a side note, these photographs are straight out of the camera. If I don’t get it right in camera then the photo is a failure, as far as I’m concerned. I do admit to trimming a few pixels off the top photograph because the D810’s viewfinder is not perfectly accurate when using 5:4 crop mode. A tiny bit of sky appeared above the bridge that was distracting. Forgive me, O Saints of the Silver Salt.

P.S. Here is the other version of the apartment photo. If anyone is reading this, perhaps you could tell me your preference in the comments.

Buses

Bus stop in front of the Kyobo Life Insurance Building, Gangneung

Photo of Gangneung city bus made from window of McDonalds early in the morning.Hamburger buns had just been delivered and the crates were sitting in front of the restaurant.

I made these photos soon after returning from Canada, where I made myself sick of digital photography. I had nearly one thousand photos to edit when I got back to Korea, not counting the ones I deleted in camera while photographing. Not much fun. Also, I brought my D810 and a 24-85mm lens to Canada, which was quite heavy and bulky. Soon after arriving in Canada I regretted my equipment choice. So, on this cloudy day in Gangneung, I left my apartment with an F80 and 28mm lens. You can see the second photo is not quite level, a combination of using a 28mm lens and me not having my head screwed on quite straight.
   When I got this film processed, I also ordered basic scans which were not that great. It also adds a few thousand Won on to the price of developing. Yesterday I had prints made of my favourite photos from the roll on Epson Eco White Matte paper that look fabulous. So I got my Canon Lide 120 scanner out of the cupboard and clicked ‘Photo Scan’. The scanner does all the work and the scans are more than good enough for posting online or making 4×6 prints to share with pen pals, etc. Happy days.

Off the Point

I went out in boat with my father several times while I was in Canada last summer. He wanted to fish and I wanted to make some photographs. There were no fish in the bay on this morning but there were a few good photo opportunities. I made this picture while my father let his line down and jigged for cod. You can see the little waves made by the boat in the foreground.
On the eastern side of Hall’s Bay is a hill called by my family (and possibly others) The Point. If you take hard right (mind the rocks) you end up in Goodyear’s Cove. If you keep going straight you eventually end up in Springdale. The Point is usually a good place to catch some fish, but it was too early in the season and we returned to West Bottom empty-handed.

Yongbong Petrol Station

I recently watched an interview with Wim Wenders and a number of his photographs were featured. I was so impressed that I ordered his book (on the way now) and went out with a camera (Nikon F80, I think) to try and make some similar photos. My attempts don’t match his results, but I did learn a new way of looking at the world around me. And that was worth the cost of film, developing, and printing.