A couple of days ago I posted a photo of my cat made with Fujifilm’s Classic Negative simulation. I’ve been using it off and on since then to see what it’s good for. If anything. Here are a few results.

Photographed from the hallway of another building in the complex.

Sometimes I bring my camera into the hall while my cat does his daily tour. I think this is the best version of the scene I’ve done so far. Looks balanced, etc. I also like the tones and colours here. I really like the blue of the sky. The shadows are deep but there is still some detail. This is straight out of the camera except for for some straightening.

Anything is art if it’s neatly arranged and you think too hard about it.

One of Fujifilm’s managers said in an interview that Classic Negative is not suited for food photography, but I think this looks fine. Maybe he meant the food doesn’t come out looking Insta-worthy with blinding colour saturation. The simulation tends to make photos look warm, depending on the situation. I tried auto white balance on this photograph. The colours became accurate, but not as good. I like the warm colour cast here.

On the other hand, fixing the white balance made this photo look much better. Maybe because we expect white fur to look white in a photograph. Amice’s fur isn’t quite as dark as this. The colours of this film are not accurate, but they are usually pleasing. The consensus seems to be that Classic Negative is modelled after Fujifilm Superia negative film. I don’t have much experience with that film, so I can’t really say. But I guess it does look like negative film.

One last example photo. I made this late in the afternoon to see how the simulation handled high contrast scenes. Very well, I think. The shadows are deep, but, well, they’re shadows and I don’t really expect to see much in them. I could lift the shadows in Lightroom, but that usually looks fake. I rather like how the photo turned out. I shifted the white balance a bit, but otherwise no adjustments.

I’m going to leave my camera set to this simulation for a while. I thought it was a bit gimmicky when I first tried it, but it’s growing on me. I just have to mind the white balance and the highlights. I’d like to get out to the beach soon to see what holiday snaps might look like using this setting.

7 thoughts on “Classic Negative Simulation Examples

    1. It’s possibly just me, but I also had ‘choice paralysis’ with film. Which one to use, what camera to put it in, how to store the prints, and so on. Digital is just another level above that. Oof. Maybe I should just buy one of those Leica Monochrome cameras with a 50mm lens and stop there. Not that I could ever afford that . . . .

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  1. I think the last shot looks the most ‘film-like’ to me, Marcus. even though I haven’t used colour negative film in decades. But where’s the grain? – doesn’t it simulate that to some extent?

    Lunch looks good, by the way 🙂

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    1. The settings for grain and simulations are more or less separate in Fuji cameras. Acros might be the exception. I set grain to ‘weak’. It takes away the ultra-clean digital look without showing up too much.
      When this covid-crap is over, come on over for a meal or two. Lots of good stuff to eat here. 🙂

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