(Self) Published

After many weeks of choosing photos, organising them, doing layout, sending the file to Blurb, buying and checking proof copies, my first collection of photos is now available on Blurb. It’s a real sense of accomplishment to hold the thin magazine in my hands and think, “I did this.”

Although I’m very happy with the finished product, I’m not that happy with the price of shipping. Shipping to Korea was over twenty dollars and shipping a copy to my parents in Canada cost about ten. Yikes. Plus ten dollars for the magazine itself. Also, Blurb must have a lot of orders, because it’s taking a long time for them to print the copy I ordered for my parents. I’m interested in making more photo collections, but I’m not sure I’ll use Blurb. Maybe Amazon? But that’s a problem for later.

You can see the magazine at Blurb if you go to https://www.blurb.com/b/10701454-beyond-the-extraordinary. If you don’t feel like buying the magazine, you can see the photos over at Flickr. https://flickr.com/photos/marcuspeddle/albums/72157719299684359

If anyone has advice about self-publishing, I’d be glad to hear it.

Apartments

I wonder how many of my posts have been called ‘Apartments’. They are such a large part of any scene in Korea that it’s difficult not to have a large collection of photos with apartments in them.
Korea’s birth rate keeps dropping and last year there were more deaths than births. But new apartment complexes keep popping up everywhere. Perhaps houses are falling down in other places.
You can see a mostly empty field in the foreground. In a couple of years there will probably be another greyish-white apartment complex and pine trees will be purchased from another part of the country to replace the persimmon trees that are there now.

Beautiful Morning

Tree and Utility Pole, Hoesan

I woke up uncharacteristically early one morning and noticed that there were some lovely clouds in the sky. I grabbed a camera and went out to make some photos of the neighbourhood. You may have seen this tree and pole on the site before. And you’ll see them again.

I think I need more practise with wide-angle lenses. The tree and pole look fine (the pole is actually tilted), but the background buildings on the right look like they are starting to roll up like in Inception.

Hahoe Village

Hahoe Village Bus Stop, 2014.

When I was working on my hipsta-traditional project, I made a trip down south to visit Hahoe Village. The village was founded in the 16th century by the Ryu clan and the village is still only inhabited by members of that family. We used to joke about small towns in Newfoundland by saying, “They’re all cousins there.” In this case, it’s true.

The village is quite famous in Korea. Queen Elizabeth II visited in 1999 and planted a tree. (She probably didn’t come by the bus in the photo). Then the village became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2010 after they got rid of all the souvenir shops and tidied it up.

The hamlet is very nice if you can avoid tourists by visiting on a weekday or in the chillier seasons. I used my iPhone for the project, but I also brought along a film camera and made a few snapshots like this one. I would like to go back again with tripod and multiple lenses. Maybe in the winter when the sun gets up at about the same time I do. 🙂

It’s pretty easy to see that this photo was made when the sun was high. The whites are very bright and the tree shadows very dark. Of particular note is the big blob in the bottom left. But it doesn’t matter. I just wanted to remember the paint job on the bus and the old people waiting for it to depart.

View from a Plastic Chair

Parking Lot, Gangmun Beach

I like the placement of the cars in the parking lot and how the ‘mast’ connects the lower and upper parts of the photograph. Everything is neatly organised, and organising the world is one of my photographic goals. I can’t do anything about the chaos of the city, but I feel better by trying to make it look good in the viewfinder.

You may be wondering what “Lifestyle Platform GS25” is about. At least two convenience store chains have the word ‘lifestyle’ in their marketing. There is a faint promise that these shops will have everything you need for a convenient and happy life. Maybe they’re not wrong; Pepsi and crisps always make me feel better.