National Assembly Patrol Car

National Assembly Patrol Car No. 1, Gangneung

This electric(?) car is parked behind a movable building in the same lot as the toilets. The National Assembly is in Seoul, not Gangneung, so why it would be growing roots out behind this yard is a bit of a mystery.

As for the building itself, I just noticed a sign in the background that says “Rest Area – Diaper Changing Station”. Insert joke about the maturity levels of national assembly members here.

Heo Estate

I mentioned in my last post that I was going to be using the Nikon D810 for the foreseeable future, but there is a queue of photos made by the X-T3 waiting to get posted here. I imagine Nikon photos will start getting posted in a few weeks. Of course, I have to get out with the camera and do some photography first . . . .

Wood and Paper Door, Heo Estate, Gangneung.

I’ve made photos of this door in the past, and here is another variation. Someday I’ll get around to choosing the best ones and putting them in a portfolio.

Papered Walls and Locked Window, Heo Estate, Gangneung.

Again, I have photos similar to this one in my archive somewhere.

These buildings are well cared for and maintained, but there is almost nothing in them except for a bit of calligraphy on the walls sometimes. Or maybe a copy of a portrait of the most famous person who lived here. It would be nice to have some furnishings to bring a bit of life to the place and provide a glimpse of historical ways of life.

Choices

I put all six of my usable cameras on my desk today to spend a few minutes using each one. I wanted to decide which one would be the best (and only?) one for me to use. I made notes about how each one felt in my hand, which one was the easiest to use, which one wouldn’t give me back pain after a day with out it, image quality (film or digital), and which camera gives me the best photos without having to spend any time at the computer adjusting sliders.
Although my four film cameras are all wonderful in their own way, I decided that I would be better off using a digital camera for reasons of economy and convenience. That left me with the Nikon D810 and the Fujifilm X-T3. The X-T3 has retro appeal and the simulations are similar to film. But it seems like I spend a lot of time making adjustments to get an excellent exposure. Always second guessing the camera. I don’t have to do that with the D810. The exposure is always dead on, except in those situations that will fool any camera meter. Sand or snow, for example. And the D810 isn’t any more complex to use than my F6 or F80. It’s a professional piece of kit that gets out of your way. And when I look at the images on computer later I don’t have to think much about changing contrast etc etc. Nikon’s picture controls do an excellent job of that. The only problem is . . . it’s quite a bit heavier than the X-T3. As I learned last year when I brought it to Canada with a large and heavy zoom lens (I think the zoom lens might have been the biggest part of the problem). What to choose for my main camera? The compact X-T3 with the disadvantage of its fussiness? Or the D810 with the inconvenience of its weight? I’d like to use only one for the sake of simplicity.
I was leaning towards the D810 by the time I finished looking over my notes, so I attached a light 50mm F1.8D lens and went downtown to make some photos.

Car Roof, Gangneung.

This was the only keeper from my downtown outing, but that was my fault, not the camera’s. I love the 5:4 frame and getting the proper exposure was a piece of cake by just adding 2/3 of a stop with the command dial. The camera took care of everything else.

Amice

What’s a photo outing without a picture of the cat at the end of it? I didn’t do anything to this one.

With a prime lens on the camera, I hardly felt the weight on my shoulder even after a couple of hours. I think I would have felt the weight if it was around my neck, though. Not so with the X-T3. Still, maybe I’ll start bringing the D810 and a prime or two with me from now on. We’ll see. I’m so wishy-washy about cameras that next week I might be using my iPhone for everything.

No, that’s not going to happen . . . .

Alley Building

Downtown Buildings, Gangneung

This was made just after coming out of the pork cutlet restaurant I mentioned in my last post. Again, I only had the slightly wide pancake lens on the camera so I couldn’t get the composition I saw using my mind’s eye. Using the 8×10 crop overlay in Lightroom solved the problem. Along with the levelling tool – my head must be screwed on slightly unevenly.

I’m not sure what’s in these buildings. The ground floors are shops and restaurants. The upper floors might have apartments or offices that don’t need window displays.

I got the print version of this photo in the mail today. Everything looks better on matte paper.

Hanging Light

Hanging Light in Restaurant, Gangneung.

I was at Central Pork Cutlet with a friend and while she was ordering at the counter I had a look around the restaurant. A lot of old buildings, shops, and houses in the downtown area are being renovated and turned into rather cosy coffee shops and other businesses. This place painted over the bare concrete walls and left the pipes showing in the ceiling. I liked the hanging light and wanted to make this photo of it, but all I had on the camera was a wide-ish lens so I had to crop heavily in Lightroom. That’s fine for sharing on a website, but I’ll remember to bring a different lens the next time I visit the restaurant.

A Walk

One of the walks I like to take near my apartment brings me to the riverside. There’s almost no water in the river during the dry winter months, but there is never a shortage of vehicles parked next to it.

Namdae River Parking Lot, Gangneung.

The car in the foreground is quite an old model, but the driver must take good care of it because there are no rust spots that I can see. The digger on the flatbed truck isn’t tied down in any way. Maybe it’s not required by law. In the weeks before the start of the Olympics I remember seeing a group of foreign engineers walking past a similar truck and being shocked that the digger in the back wasn’t secured.
On the other side of the river there is a shrine dedicated to, if I remember correctly, a local goddess, though I can’t remember who or what she is the goddess of. I should walk over there some day and see if there is anything worth photographing.

Namdae River Parking Lot, Gangneung.

I think the slang term for this sort of vehicle is ‘honey truck’. When I lived in a house, one of these would come around twice a year to clean out the septic tank. I remember the guy who did the work was quite jolly. Well, he probably makes a fortune doing the work no one else wants to.

Hillstate Apartments, Gangneung.

On the way home I made this photo because I liked the clouds above the apartments. These buildings were completed about one year ago, replacing fields. They look like something you would build out of a basic Lego set.