In and to the sides of Wolhwa Park

Wolhwa Park was built on the land once occupied by a train line. It’s about two kilometres long and generally fifteen metres wide. I go there now and then to make photos, but I can’t seem to do much with it.
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Side Street.

Because the tracks were elevated to go over the river, some of the park is also elevated. From up on high I can look down this side street to the fortune teller part of downtown. I don’t have any tilt-shift lenses, so I straightened the verticals in Lightroom.
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Old residential area.

Directly on the other side of the park is a residential area. Older buildings are constantly being torn down in this part of the city, so it’s probably only a matter of time before this little neighbourhood is gone. I won’t be sorry to see it gone, but it would be nice if the poverty-era buildings were replaced with traditional Korean homes. More than likely they’ll be replaced by coffee shops.
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Wolhwa Pavilion

This pavilion seems to be poorly visited, except for old men smoking at its base. Maybe that’s why it’s poorly visited . . . . .
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Ancestral Shrine (probably)

I thought this building was a part of the park because of the landscaping leading up to the entrance. But I was informed by some litter cleaners that it’s part of a private residence. Oops. This is one of the photos I made before scurrying off.
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Train Tunnel, Wolhwa Park.

It took me a while to find a framing I was happy with and then the timing to get someone to complete the composition.
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Litter Cleaner

In spring the city employs hordes of senior citizens to pick up litter around the city. They go by the names of “Seniors’ Club” or “Volunteer Group” and they get paid a bit of money every week.
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I’m more comfortable making photos on a tripod at historical sites than I am wandering the streets of a city, but with some practice maybe I can produce some decent photos to show people what Gangneung looks like.

New Traditional Buildings

Gangneung built a new city hall on top of a hill and tore down the old one which was situated in the downtown area. Some years later they got rid of the big Central Post Office which was right next door to the old city hall and built new traditional-style buildings on the vacant lots. These buildings are used for festivals and events pretty much all through the year. There is even a very small library in one of the buildings. I think it’s great that the city turned a piece of prime business real estate into something that everyone in the city can enjoy. And, even better, they built traditional Korean buildings instead of the usual concrete, steel, and glass rectangles that pop up all around the city.

Traditional Gatehouse, Gangneung.
The latest addition to the grounds was this gatehouse.
Traditional Building, Gangneung
This building gets opened up during festivals to display exhibitions and hold traditional events. When nothing is going on, it’s nice to sit on the veranda (called a maru in Korean) and relax.

Kodak Portra 400 + Nikon F6

You can tell when a roll of film has been in a camera for a while because of the different subjects in the photographs. A film lab owner once complained to me that some people made so few photos that there were fours seasons on one roll. And that was before digital cameras and smart phones.
There is only one season on the roll of Portra 400 I used last month, but there was definitely a variety of scenes. WARNING! A few of them are disturbing.

Electric Meters, Downtown Gangneung

This is probably just disturbing to electricians and safety inspectors.

No Parking, Downtown Gangneung

This is disturbing to pedestrians and cyclists. I included the ‘R’ in the top left sign reading ‘WONDER’ when I made the photo, but it was cut by the lab. Grrr . . . . The yellow writing on the pavement says ‘tow zone’.

Building Jumble, Downtown Gangneung

Disturbing to architects? But fun for photographers.

Here are the disturbing photos I mentioned in the introduction. This is a water deer, probably killed by one of the speeding cars that drive madly over the blind hill on this road. There are many deer in the outskirts of Gangneung, but this ‘sabre-toothed’ deer is fairly uncommon. Poor bugger. Probably killed by some arsehole checking his phone messages while driving.

Friends Talking, Wolhwa Bridge

I made this photo while I was waiting for these two men to leave so I could set up my tripod and camera.

Island in Namdae River, Gangneung

The men eventually moved on and I started making photos of this island.

Island in Namdae River, Gangneung

I like the reflections of the apartments in the water.

Backstreet Neighbourhood, Gangneung

The final photo of this post was made at one end of the Wolhwa bridge. I waited around and made a number of frames but only this one was presentable. People were either walking too quickly, wearing ugly clothes, or weren’t walking close enough to the house wall. I should probably make these photos while I can, because City Hall might have plans to raze this area and make more space for coffee shops . . . .